C’mon by to experience the tropical-inspired oasis along the Columbia River. 

Bike Friendly Pet Friendly Wi-Fi

Upcoming Events

Friends & Family Night - Benefit for Youth and Family Link
Tuesday, May 21
Folkslinger
Wednesday, May 22
Jack McMahon
Thursday, May 23
David Pollack
Wednesday, May 29

About Kalama Harbor Lodge

Experience this tropics-inspired oasis on the Columbia River.

Kalama Walking Guide 

Kalama Harbor Lodge, situated between Kalama’s landmark totem poles and the marina at the Port of Kalama, opened in 2018. Inspired by the Hawaiian heritage of John Kalama, the property is reminiscent of the Pioneer Inn in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii. 

Come for the King Kalama burger, stay for the adventure – right inside the hotel. From the ground floor, wind your way up to the Cloud Bar, pausing on each floor to discover art, local history and secret rooms. Each guestroom is named for the vivid cast of characters (and events) who have colored the history of Kalama. Find Shirley Loman’s or The Cowlitz Tribe’s stories, then find their namesake rooms. Each guestroom features a king-sized bed, bathroom and lanai, many with river views.

Finally, you’ll reached the clouds – or at least the Cloud Bar. With expansive views of the Columbia, gnarled wood “sculptures,” and rough-hewn timbers, this near-rooftop bar serves up tropics-inspired cocktails like the Jungle Bird or Salty Lass, along with a scrumptious bar menu, because you might not want to leave.

But if you do, meander down to the pub for Cedar Plank Salmon or the Whiskey-Brined Pork Loin – or start your day there with the Longshoreman’s Breakfast.

A few steps to the north of the pub, past the stained glassed Holoholo Room, travel back in time and across an ocean to the Polynesian-inspired Harbor Lounge, where you can’t help but notice the outrigger canoe hanging front and center; take a closer look, it was hand carved in Tonga in 1960 and still bears the stains of the many octopuses that were hauled aboard. Sink into a comfy armchair near the woodstove on a winter afternoon and watch storms roll up the river. Or stop in for free live music on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

During warmer months, the wrap-around patio is the place to be. Watch the people out for a riverside stroll or the container ships lumbering down the river under the weight of their loads, en route to ports unknown. Imagine your own next adventure – or just step inside to create one.

Kalama Harbor Lodge Guestrooms


Check-in is at 3 p.m.; check-out is at 11 a.m.

Kalama Harbor Lodge offers King rooms which include a television, telephone, complimentary wi-fi and private bathroom with shower. Pet friendly rooms available, call to inquire.

McMenamins Frequent Guest Program

Frequent Guest Login

Stay at our historic hotels and earn free nights! You can accrue as many points for reward nights as you are able - there are no limits!

Please note: We are unable to issue points for reservations made through Expedia and Booking.com. For best results, book directly through mcmenamins.com or by calling our hotels. Limit one room per guest per night.

How does it work?

  • First, create or update your profile in our online reservations system and follow the prompts to join the Frequent Guest Program; you'll receive monthly email reminders about the program.
  • Stay with us! Points are automatically rewarded 72 hours after check out - you'll receive 100 points per night in rooms with a common bath, 150 points per night in rooms with a private bath and 50 points per night in Hostel rooms. Your accrued points can be viewed at any time in your online profile. Please note: points accrued during your stay are not available for immediate redemption.
  • When you've accrued 900 points or more, availability search results on our online system will include a "900 point" rate for rooms (based on availability). Choose this rate to redeem your points. Add-ons, like our Romance Packages will still be available at regular prices.
  • You may also book redemption nights by phone or in person for future stays.

Rules

  • This offer is for individual bookings only; the offer does not apply to contracted groups or conferences.
  • All of your qualifying nights must be booked under the same guest profile for points to accrue correctly.
  • Only 1 room per night is accruable.
  • You must be a member of the Frequent Guest Program to accrue points and redeem your complimentary stays.
  • Qualifying nights begin the day you sign up!
  • The free room is based on a standard king or queen-size room. The Grand Suite at Grand Lodge, Family Suite and Parrish House at Old St. Francis, and Family Rooms at Edgefield are not available for redemption.
  • Based on availability; blackout dates may apply. No credit for "no-shows."
  • Reward nights and free or sponsored promotional stays are excluded from earning points in the program.
  • After 5 years of inactivity, your profile points and any reward nights are lost.
  • No credit for "no-shows” or cancellations within cancellation policy.

Any questions can be sent to loyalty@mcmenamins.com.
Please note: All rules are subject to change.

Moorage & Local Attractions

Explore the area!

Port of Kalama: Marine Park & Rasmussen Day-Use Park

Just outside our doors, set on the Columbia River, is the five-acre day-use Marine Park. A playground, picnic area, and scenic walking/bicycle path provide instant outdoor entertainment. It doesn’t get any more local than that! 

Adjacent to the park and McMenamins is a collection of totem poles crafted by local Native American Don Lelooska, Take a moment to visit these poles, which tell stories of Northwest Coast Native Americans, as seen in the mythical forms, symbols and creatures. The tallest of these, at 140 feet, is the largest one-piece totem pole in the world. In September 2018, it was lowered for repairs – the up-side being that now is your chance to see the top up close!

Further along the path is Rasmussen Day Use Park, with covered picnic shelters, sand volleyball courts, horseshoes, and combined tennis and basketball courts. Pass these on your way to our Ahles Point Cabin, a cozy small bar with a fireplace and river-view patio!

Pets are welcome, but must be leashed.

Shopping

Quaint Kalama is known for its antique treasures. For a list of the seven antique stores, see this map.

Casino

The Ilani Casino Resort is a 15-minute drive south of Kalama. Operated by the Cowlitz Tribe, Ilani has 100,000 square feet of gaming, including slots and table games. Their Muze Lounge offers live music on select nights, and they also offer shopping boutiques, a Starbucks and other dining options. They’re open daily.

Golf

Bring along your clubs to head to nearby greens, including the Three Rivers Golf Course in Kelso, 13 miles away; and the Tri Mountain Golf Course in Ridgefield, 15 miles away.

Other Attractions

The Cowlitz County Historical Museum in Kelso offers artifacts and interpretive exhibits.

The Hulda Klager Lilac Garden is a nonprofit historical 7-acre site in Woodland, open daily to see the 90 varieties of lilacs, as well as Victorian gardens and a farmhouse.

Paradise Point State Park is along the Lewis River in Ridgefield, and is a place for hiking, fishing, camping and swimming.

Further East

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Gifford Pinchot National Forest & Ape Caves are about a 45-minute drive from Kalama, and offer forests, mountains, waterfalls, caves, observatories and more. Hiking, sightseeing and caving are popular.

See what's going on while you're here...

Events

Art

  • Ross LaRoy

    Ross LaRoy
  • Kalama Flood of '48

    Kalama Flood of '48
  • Dick and Grace Sorter

    Dick and Grace Sorter
  • Soldiers

    Soldiers
  • Mellie Pullman

    Mellie Pullman
  • John “Lucky Jack” Peterson

    John “Lucky Jack” Peterson
  • Elephant

    Elephant
  • D.B Cooper

    D.B Cooper
  • Eliza Jane Meeker

    Eliza Jane Meeker
  • Queen

    Queen
  • Welcome to Kalama

    Welcome to Kalama
  • Wai

    Wai
  • Twilight

    Twilight
  • Wild Pigeon

    Wild Pigeon
  • Family

    Family
  • Lodge

    Lodge
  • Village

    Village
  • Monticello Burbee

    Monticello Burbee
  • Pioneer Inn

    Pioneer Inn
  • The Doty Fish Company

    The Doty Fish Company
  • Westwick & Nichol

    Westwick & Nichol
  • Elias Carlson

    Elias Carlson
  • Sasquatch

    Sasquatch
  • Abe

    Abe
  • John Hogatt

    John Hogatt
  • Dale Groff

    Dale Groff
  • Couple

    Couple
  • Brando

    Brando
  • John Kalama

    John Kalama
  • The Port

    The Port
  • Virgil Simmons

    Virgil Simmons
  • Chief Tsungani

    Chief Tsungani
  • Charles Funk

    Charles Funk
  • The Cowlitz Tribe

    The Cowlitz Tribe
  • Shirley Loman

    Shirley Loman
  • John Moses

    John Moses
  • Chuck & Nora Amren

    Chuck & Nora Amren
  • Joanna Boatman

    Joanna Boatman
  • Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson
  • The Harriman Expedition

    The Harriman Expedition

History

It’s a new building but one that’s awash in history.
Walk around, grab a drink, explore, and take in the architecture, artwork, photographs,
and stunning river views.
This spot has been
attracting people for centuries.
 
The Lodge itself stands invitingly on its riverfront perch, boasting a look and style that’s not from here. Those who have visited Maui, though, will surely see a resemblance to the historic Pioneer Inn at Lahaina. This architectural choice is a tribute to the community’s namesake, John Kalama.
 
Kalama was one of the many Hawaiians who came to the Pacific Northwest in the early 1800s to work for the British Hudson’s Bay Company, fur-trapping and farming. Unlike most of the Hawaiians, though, John remained in the area, married a native Nisqualy woman and had children. For a time, they made their home just north of here, near the mouth of the river that now bears his name, Kalama.
 
For centuries before John Kalama’s arrival, this area was home to Native Chinook and Cowlitz people, and they maintained seasonal camps for fishing and gathering food near the Kalama River’s confluence with the Columbia River. Theirs was a long and rich existence along the Columbia River corridor, until British and American traders and settlers arrived and made claim to the land and introduced disease.
 
1870 was a momentous year in the history of this community, for that’s when the Northern Pacific Railroad initiated construction of its new transcontinental rail line. This site was declared the railroad’s western terminus, and a town was platted. Suddenly prices for town lots skyrocketed. Bids came in from as far away as New York City. Searching for a suitable name for the new town, an NPR official said, “Name it after the nearby river.” And so Kalama it was.
 
And what followed was an impressive boom. Over the next few years, Kalama was a cosmopolitan place, with a rising population from diverse backgrounds and economic stations. And of course there were plenty of hucksters and shysters at the ready to separate people from their money.
 
 As quickly as it had started, the bottom fell out of Kalama’s soaring prosperity. The community lost its status (and lots of income-generating business) as NPR’s western terminus, when the rail line was completed to the Puget Sound, and Tacoma was named the new “end of the line.”
 
This misfortune was followed by a seemingly continuous stream of calamities (sometimes referred to as Kalamaties) into the early 1900s, most in the form of destructive fires and floods.
 
Kalama’s saving grace during this difficult stretch was the advent of railroad transfer ferry service in and out of Kalama. In lieu of a railroad bridge across the Columbia, a massive ferryboat was built to carry entire trains (the cars of which were disconnected for the journey) from one side of the river to the other. This service ensured Kalama a certain amount of business and status during its operation from 1884 to 1908.
 
During this period, other developments gradually came to the community. Fishing was always abundant. The establishment of processing plants, notably the Doty Fish Company, increased production and created more local jobs. The same was true in the logging and lumber industry. The first large scale railroad logging and milling operation began in 1909 with the Willard Case Timber Company, which promptly morphed into the Mountain Timber Company the following year.
 
These developments gradually, and sometimes halting, led to the improvement of the harbor and development of the Port of Kalama, and today it is a West Coast leader, serving companies from all over the globe.
 
What’s made the difference in Kalama are the local people committed to their neighbors and their community. It still is small town here, but does big business with the world.

Harbor Lodge Market

Across from the Brewery, stop in the market. Get a pint while you shop or a growler fill to go; our taps include McMenamins cider, seasonal beer, standard beer and nitro coffee. Our staff will custom-make a drink at the espresso bar, where there are also fresh pastries made daily.

Take home an old favorite or discover something new from the multiple coolers filled with McMenamins’ beer and guest cider and beer to go.

Gear up with McMenamins T-shirts, hoodies, bar accessories, drinkware and gifts. Headed to the park and port? We’ve got swimsuits, kites, Frisbees and snacks to go.

Hold Your Private Event at Kalama Harbor Lodge

Weddings  Meetings  Social Events

Our newest destination has a dedicated meeting and event space – Old 97 – for 15 to 100 people. We’ll host your next meeting, event or nuptials – we even have doors that open to lanais. The space is fondly named ‘Old 97’ for the railroad switch engine used to disassemble and reassemble train cars on the transfer ferry that crossed the Columbia River at Kalama.

Having an event at this new property means enjoying its Island-inspired feel, as it was modeled after the Pioneer Inn on Maui. A few of the unique private events menu items include a Tiki Pupu Party menu with Year of the Dragon Pork Sliders and Egg Rolls; and a North Shore Buffet with Island Slaw, Three Rocks Jerk Chicken and Coconut Shrimp.

Contact our sales team to inquire or book your event.
Get Started Here

Moorage & Local Attractions

Explore the area!

Port of Kalama: Marine Park & Rasmussen Day-Use Park

Just outside our doors, set on the Columbia River, is the five-acre day-use Marine Park. A playground, picnic area, and scenic walking/bicycle path provide instant outdoor entertainment. It doesn’t get any more local than that! 

Adjacent to the park and McMenamins is a collection of totem poles crafted by local Native American Don Lelooska, Take a moment to visit these poles, which tell stories of Northwest Coast Native Americans, as seen in the mythical forms, symbols and creatures. The tallest of these, at 140 feet, is the largest one-piece totem pole in the world. In September 2018, it was lowered for repairs – the up-side being that now is your chance to see the top up close!

Further along the path is Rasmussen Day Use Park, with covered picnic shelters, sand volleyball courts, horseshoes, and combined tennis and basketball courts. Pass these on your way to our Ahles Point Cabin, a cozy small bar with a fireplace and river-view patio!

Pets are welcome, but must be leashed.

Shopping

Quaint Kalama is known for its antique treasures. For a list of the seven antique stores, see this map.

Casino

The Ilani Casino Resort is a 15-minute drive south of Kalama. Operated by the Cowlitz Tribe, Ilani has 100,000 square feet of gaming, including slots and table games. Their Muze Lounge offers live music on select nights, and they also offer shopping boutiques, a Starbucks and other dining options. They’re open daily.

Golf

Bring along your clubs to head to nearby greens, including the Three Rivers Golf Course in Kelso, 13 miles away; and the Tri Mountain Golf Course in Ridgefield, 15 miles away.

Other Attractions

The Cowlitz County Historical Museum in Kelso offers artifacts and interpretive exhibits.

The Hulda Klager Lilac Garden is a nonprofit historical 7-acre site in Woodland, open daily to see the 90 varieties of lilacs, as well as Victorian gardens and a farmhouse.

Paradise Point State Park is along the Lewis River in Ridgefield, and is a place for hiking, fishing, camping and swimming.

Further East

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Gifford Pinchot National Forest & Ape Caves are about a 45-minute drive from Kalama, and offer forests, mountains, waterfalls, caves, observatories and more. Hiking, sightseeing and caving are popular.
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