Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Edgefield History Pub

The Tribal Treaty Fishery: A Historical and Modern-Day Perspective

5 p.m. doors, 6:30 p.m event
Free
All ages welcome

About The Tribal Treaty Fishery: A Historical and Modern-Day Perspective

Presented by: Stuart Ellis, Harvest biologist with the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Troutdale Historical Society and McMenamins History

The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) is a technical and coordinating agency for the four tribes with treaty reserved fishing rights on the Columbia River: the Warm Springs, Umatilla, Yakama and Nez Perce. Join CRITFC Harvest biologist, Stuart Ellis, for a look at the historical and modern-day perspective of the tribal treaty fishery along the Columbia River. He'll discuss the cultural foundation for tribal fisheries and explore how this cultural foundation has informed tribal decisions throughout time. The tribal presence along the Columbia goes back thousands of years, as does the tribes relationship with salmon and fishing and is the basis for tribal spiritual, cultural, and economic life. This relationship extends into the present and helps explain the tribes' focus on salmon recovery, their current fisheries, and their goals for the future.

Photo Credit: Fishing at Celilo Falls; Oreg. Hist. Soc. Research Lib., OrHi 7784

About Edgefield History Pub

Edgefield History Pub

These monthly, free events are open to everyone interested in Oregon and Pacific Northwest history. Co-sponsored by like-minded historical and civic organizations, we bring you experts, scholars, first-person experiencers and historians who expound on topics from Lewis and Clark to shipwrecks, hop growing to women pioneers and far, far beyond. It's like being back in the classroom - except this time you get to settle into comfortable seats and enjoy a drink or two with dinner while you listen and learn.