demo

Thursday, November 11, 2021

Jim Lauderdale

The Mastersons with Bonnie Whitmore

8 p.m.

$22 in advance, $25 day of show

21 and over

Share this event

Add to Calendar

All attendees must either: 1) be at least two weeks past receiving full COVID vaccination and show a vaccination card along with photo ID, or 2) show proof of a negative PCR COVID test within 72 hours preceding the show, along with photo ID. Test must be medically administered. At-home tests not accepted. All ticketholders must wear face masks at all times except when eating or drinking.

Jim Lauderdale

Americana innovator

Jim Lauderdale

“He’s my favorite part of Americana music.” – Ketch Secor, Old Crow Medicine Show

“He’s a man of great style, an exceptional songwriter and tremendous singer.” – Elvis Costello

“Jim Lauderdale is a consummate entertainer, a sharp-dressed man as well, a terrific songwriter and a great singer." – George Strait

“Jim Lauderdale could easily be called a renaissance man. He’s a great singer, great guitar player and there’s no way you could miss his work as a songwriter.” – Ricky Skaggs


Jim Lauderdale is a two-time Grammy-winning Americana icon, a singer-songwriter whose unmistakable rhinestone-encrusted silhouette has been a symbol for creative integrity and prolificacy for thirty-one albums over decades of recording. He’s an A-list Nashville songwriter whose songs have ruled the country charts while recording an eclectic catalog of albums that run the gamut of American roots styles. His prolific streak of releases continues in 2019 with his new album From Another World.

The ten songs contained within, all written or co-written by Lauderdale, are his antidote to the anger, divisiveness of today’s world, a world full of bad news and folks yelling at each other on CNN. This is music from another world, a world of empathy, love, forgiveness and humility. Where people find freedom through togetherness, where they struggle to change for the better, where country music still cries with the sound of pedal steel guitar and psychedelic-tinged lyrics flow through aching indelible melodies.

From the start of his career, Lauderdale has been creating his own musical world. Too expansive, eclectic and creatively curious to fit into any prescribed genre boxes, he innovated what is now called Americana music, long before there was a term for it. Everything about the man and his music is classic and timeless, but he’s a total original. The McCartney-esque melodies sung in his aching high lonesome tenor, the fiercely authentic bluegrass songs with mind-expanding psychedelic lyrics… nothing about Lauderdale’s music can be reduced to a single influence, and no other songwriter would fuse these classic strains of tune-craft into such unexpected but immediately satisfying combinations.

“A long time ago, I decided that with each record, I would ignore the categories people tried to put me into and just make the music that was in my heart,” Lauderdale explains. “This album is about the search for connection, love and understanding between people, about finding empathy in a world where it feels like folks are more and more at loggerheads. When the world outside your window feels too tough to bear, I hope you’ll step into the world we’ve created here.”

The scion of a preacher dad and music teacher mom in rural North Carolina, Lauderdale’s world was turned upside as a kid when he saw The Beatles explosive debut on Ed Sullivan, rewiring his creative mind. Teaching himself a variety of instruments, Lauderdale explored songwriting as a teenager, fueled by a musical diet that ran the gamut from George Jones to the Grateful Dead, Al Green to the Stanley Brothers.

A visit to Nashville opened Lauderdale’s eyes to how hard he would need to work to realize his dreams of emulating his troubadour heroes – recording a bluegrass album with legendary mandolin player Roland White, but unable to find a record deal (the album was finally released last year).

In 1980, Lauderdale headed to New York City to cut his teeth in the country clubs, making fast friends with fellow musical iconoclasts like Buddy Miller and Shawn Colvin. Jim honed his live chops and graduated to Los Angeles, where he spent the late '80s at the center of the fiery alt-country scene alongside Lucinda Williams and Dwight Yoakam, packing out the Palomino Club and catching the eyes of the local crowds and industry alike, leading to his first record deal.

While his classic '90s albums like Planet of Love and Pretty Close to the Truth drew him rave reviews, Lauderdale’s musical style was too eclectic to fit easily into the major label country box. There was no genre label for a left-of-center blend of country, blues, rock, soul, folk and bluegrass, so he had to pioneer one. These days, the identity of Americana music and Jim Lauderdale are one and the same. The first ever winner of the Americana Music Association’s Song and Artist of the Year trophies and the honorary Wagonmaster award, Jim also served as host of the awards for many years. While some people struggle to define what Americana music is, others just point to Jim’s eclectic but totally cohesive catalog as the defining example.

Although he never got to work with his idol Gram Parsons, who he immortalized in his classic signature song "The King of Broken Hearts" (also the title of a feature documentary on him), Lauderdale has realized that great dream of any musician – to stand shoulder to shoulder making music with his biggest inspirations. His duet albums with bluegrass icon Dr. Ralph Stanley earned Jim his first Grammy award, he’s penned albums worth of bluegrass gems with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter and he’s on a short list that includes Paul McCartney and Allen Toussaint as a writing partner of Elvis Costello.

It’s no wonder that artists from Willie Nelson to John Oates line up to collaborate with him, hoping to snare some of that Lauderdale magic. After all, his songs have helped sell millions of albums for artists like George Strait, Dixie Chicks, Patty Loveless, Lee Ann Womack, Blake Shelton, Solomon Burke, Gary Allan and Vince Gill. Classic songs like "Where the Sidewalk Ends," "You Don’t Seem to Miss Me," "Hole in My Head," "Halfway Down," "We Really Shouldn’t Be Doing This" and many more have come from his pen.

With his new album From Another World, Jim has once again opened his heart wide and delivered a record of original songs that plays like a greatest hits set. From the opening one-two punch of hard-charging Dylanesque "Some Horses Run Free" and desperation-led waltz "When You Can’t Have What Your Heart Wants," it’s obvious Lauderdale is firing on all cylinders. "The Secrets of the Pyramids" evokes the twangy psychedelia of the Byrds at their best, rich in harmonies from Third Man Records star Lillie Mae and her brother Frank Rische. The video is a tongue-in-cheek homage to the clip for Toto’s "Africa" and features Lauderdale and acclaimed singer-songwriter Elizabeth Cook in starring roles. Nothing evokes the ghosts of George Jones like instantly classic country love songs "For Keeps" (released this year on Valentine’s Day), "Like People From Another World" and "I’ll Forgive You If You Don’t." The expansive, questioning "One Away" leads into the empathetic finger-picked "Listen." "Slow Turn In The Road" is a bluesy chug lead by stinging guitars and a deeply soulful lead vocal, "Ever Living Loving Day" is the kind of clever-but-playful lyric he can write like no other and the album culminates in the wild rave-up "Are You Trying To Make A Song out of Us?"

“When I write or play or get into the studio, it feels like it’s all coming together for me - that this is what I’m here to do. No matter what is going on in the rest of my life, how hard things sometimes get, I can leave behind this three and a half minute song and that makes it all worthwhile.”

Website:
http://www.jimlauderdale.com/

Instagram:
http://www.instagram.com/jimlauderdale1/

Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/JimLauderdaleOfficial

Twitter:
http://twitter.com/jimlauderdale1

The Mastersons with Bonnie Whitmore

The Mastersons with Bonnie Whitmore

Don't bother asking The Mastersons where they're from. Brooklyn, Austin, Los Angeles, Terlingua; they've called each home in just the last few years alone. If you really want to get to know this husband-and-wife duo, the better question to ask is where they're going. Perhaps more than any other band playing today, The Mastersons live on the road, perpetually in motion and always creating. Movement is their muse. On tour, in the unpredictable adventures and characters they cross, in the endless blur of skylines and rest stops and dressing rooms and hotels, that's where they find their greatest inspiration, where they hone their art, and where they crafted their brilliant new album, Transient Lullaby.

"When you travel like we do, if your antenna is up, there's always something going on around you," reflects guitarist/singer Chris Masterson. "Ideas can be found everywhere. The hardest thing to find is time."

For the last seven years, The Mastersons have kept up a supremely inexorable touring schedule, performing as both the openers for Steve Earle and as members of his band, The Dukes, in addition to playing their own relentless slate of headline shows and festivals. It was Earle, in fact, who pushed the duo to record their acclaimed debut, Birds Fly South, in the first place.

"Before we hit the road with him in 2010, Steve said, 'You'd better have a record ready because I'm going to feature you guys during the show,'" remembers fiddler/tenor guitarist/singer Eleanor Whitmore. "We didn't even have a band name at the time. We were going through all these ideas and Steve suggested, 'Why don't you just be The Mastersons, and that was that."

Upon its release in 2012, Birds Fly South was a breakout critical hit on both sides of the pond, with Uncut awarding the album 9/10 stars and Esquire dubbing The Mastersons one of the "Bands You Need To Know Right Now". Two years later, they followed it up with Good Luck Charm, premiered by the NY Times and praised by Mother Jones for its "big-hearted lyrics, tight song structures, and sweetly intertwined harmonies." Pop Matters ranked it "among the top Americana releases of 2014," while American Songwriter called it "a perfect soundtrack for a summer of warm nights and hot, lazy days," and the Austin Chronicle praised the band's "spunky wit and rare measure of emotional maturity." The album earned The Mastersons slots on NPR's Mountain Stage and at festivals around the world, from San Francisco's Hardly Strictly Bluegrass to Australia's Byron Bay Bluesfest.

With endless touring came new levels of comfort and confidence, and when it was time to record Transient Lullaby, The Mastersons knew they wanted to take a different approach than their first two releases. The band set up shop at Arlyn Studios in Austin, TX, where Chris shared production duties with longtime friend and collaborator George Reiff (Ray Wylie Hubbard, Band of Heathens). Together, they chased a sound that was subtler and more evocative, deeper and more contemplative.

"A lot of what we listen to when we have some rare time off is what we consider late night music," explains Chris, who previously played guitar with Son Volt and Jack Ingram among others. "The last record was bright and jangly and we wanted this one to be vibey and dark. A lot of the stuff is very performance-based and not at all fussed with. We've grown so much more comfortable in our skin that we really weren't trying to sound like anyone other than ourselves this time around."

"We've had a lot of time and a lot of miles to refine our sound and our style of singing," adds Eleanor, whose resume includes work with Regina Spektor and Angus & Julia Stone. "I think the depth of our songwriting has really grown, too. Part of the time we're writing on a tour bus with Steve Earle, and the bar for poetry is pretty high when you're within earshot of one of the greatest songwriters alive."

Rich with Eleanor's stirring string arrangements and Chris's masterful guitar work, the songs on Transient Lullaby more than live up to the challenge. The album opens with "Perfect," a loping duet written partially in Washington, DC, and partially in Newcastle, England, that paints a portrait of two broken lovers who still manage to find a strange optimism in this challenging world. Spare and affecting, the song puts the spotlight on the duo's intoxicating vocal harmonies and makes for an ideal entry point into an album full of characters facing down difficulty and darkness with all the grit and humility they can muster. "Fight," written in a downtown Cleveland hotel, is a wry wink at the battlefield of marriage ("I don't wanna fight with anyone else but you"), while the fingerpicked "Highway 1" twists and turns on a California road trip through an emotional breakup.

"Life's not easy," reflects Chris. "It's hard for everybody, and I don't see it getting any easier. All you can hope for yourself is grace when walking through it, and someone to prop you up when you need a little help."

Though it's a deeply personal album, Transient Lullaby is not without its political moments. The Mastersons found themselves on tour in Lexington, KY, during the height of Kim Davis' obstinate stand against the Supreme Court's same sex marriage decision, and so they penned the infectious "You Could Be Wrong" in a dressing room before taking the stage with "Love Wins" draped across their guitars. "This Isn't How It Was Supposed To Go"-a cosmic country duet written in Cologne, Germany-has taken on new layers of political meaning in 2017, while "Don't Tell Me To Smile" is a tongue-in-cheek feminist anthem, and the gorgeous, slow-burning "Fire Escape"-which came to life in a hockey rink locker room in Alberta, Canada-suggests that the only solution to a polarized world of fear and distrust is to find strength and guidance in our loved ones.

"As we look at the world political landscape, global warming, a refugee crisis and the uncertain times we're all living in, rather than lose hope, we look to each other," Chris says. "It's a little brighter than Cormac McCarthy's The Road, but not much."

Ultimately, the road is at the core of everything The Mastersons do. "Happy When I'm Movin'" reflects their constant need for forward momentum, both physically and emotionally, and the title track paints the pair as "pilgrims of the interstate" on an endless voyage. "No I don't unpack my bag / Traveling from town to town," they sing in beautiful harmony. "Set 'em up and knock 'em down / Where there's work and songs to sing / You'll know the place where I'll be found / If you don't want to be alone / Then come along."

For The Mastersons, all that matters is where they're headed, and the songs they'll write when they get there.

 

Website:
http://www.themastersonsmusic.com

Events

  • Thursday, November 11, 2021

    Jim Lauderdale

    The Mastersons with Bonnie Whitmore

    8 p.m.

    $22 in advance, $25 day of show

    21 and over

    Share this event

    Add to Calendar

    All attendees must either: 1) be at least two weeks past receiving full COVID vaccination and show a vaccination card along with photo ID, or 2) show proof of a negative PCR COVID test within 72 hours preceding the show, along with photo ID. Test must be medically administered. At-home tests not accepted. All ticketholders must wear face masks at all times except when eating or drinking.

    Jim Lauderdale

    Americana innovator

    Jim Lauderdale

    “He’s my favorite part of Americana music.” – Ketch Secor, Old Crow Medicine Show

    “He’s a man of great style, an exceptional songwriter and tremendous singer.” – Elvis Costello

    “Jim Lauderdale is a consummate entertainer, a sharp-dressed man as well, a terrific songwriter and a great singer." – George Strait

    “Jim Lauderdale could easily be called a renaissance man. He’s a great singer, great guitar player and there’s no way you could miss his work as a songwriter.” – Ricky Skaggs


    Jim Lauderdale is a two-time Grammy-winning Americana icon, a singer-songwriter whose unmistakable rhinestone-encrusted silhouette has been a symbol for creative integrity and prolificacy for thirty-one albums over decades of recording. He’s an A-list Nashville songwriter whose songs have ruled the country charts while recording an eclectic catalog of albums that run the gamut of American roots styles. His prolific streak of releases continues in 2019 with his new album From Another World.

    The ten songs contained within, all written or co-written by Lauderdale, are his antidote to the anger, divisiveness of today’s world, a world full of bad news and folks yelling at each other on CNN. This is music from another world, a world of empathy, love, forgiveness and humility. Where people find freedom through togetherness, where they struggle to change for the better, where country music still cries with the sound of pedal steel guitar and psychedelic-tinged lyrics flow through aching indelible melodies.

    From the start of his career, Lauderdale has been creating his own musical world. Too expansive, eclectic and creatively curious to fit into any prescribed genre boxes, he innovated what is now called Americana music, long before there was a term for it. Everything about the man and his music is classic and timeless, but he’s a total original. The McCartney-esque melodies sung in his aching high lonesome tenor, the fiercely authentic bluegrass songs with mind-expanding psychedelic lyrics… nothing about Lauderdale’s music can be reduced to a single influence, and no other songwriter would fuse these classic strains of tune-craft into such unexpected but immediately satisfying combinations.

    “A long time ago, I decided that with each record, I would ignore the categories people tried to put me into and just make the music that was in my heart,” Lauderdale explains. “This album is about the search for connection, love and understanding between people, about finding empathy in a world where it feels like folks are more and more at loggerheads. When the world outside your window feels too tough to bear, I hope you’ll step into the world we’ve created here.”

    The scion of a preacher dad and music teacher mom in rural North Carolina, Lauderdale’s world was turned upside as a kid when he saw The Beatles explosive debut on Ed Sullivan, rewiring his creative mind. Teaching himself a variety of instruments, Lauderdale explored songwriting as a teenager, fueled by a musical diet that ran the gamut from George Jones to the Grateful Dead, Al Green to the Stanley Brothers.

    A visit to Nashville opened Lauderdale’s eyes to how hard he would need to work to realize his dreams of emulating his troubadour heroes – recording a bluegrass album with legendary mandolin player Roland White, but unable to find a record deal (the album was finally released last year).

    In 1980, Lauderdale headed to New York City to cut his teeth in the country clubs, making fast friends with fellow musical iconoclasts like Buddy Miller and Shawn Colvin. Jim honed his live chops and graduated to Los Angeles, where he spent the late '80s at the center of the fiery alt-country scene alongside Lucinda Williams and Dwight Yoakam, packing out the Palomino Club and catching the eyes of the local crowds and industry alike, leading to his first record deal.

    While his classic '90s albums like Planet of Love and Pretty Close to the Truth drew him rave reviews, Lauderdale’s musical style was too eclectic to fit easily into the major label country box. There was no genre label for a left-of-center blend of country, blues, rock, soul, folk and bluegrass, so he had to pioneer one. These days, the identity of Americana music and Jim Lauderdale are one and the same. The first ever winner of the Americana Music Association’s Song and Artist of the Year trophies and the honorary Wagonmaster award, Jim also served as host of the awards for many years. While some people struggle to define what Americana music is, others just point to Jim’s eclectic but totally cohesive catalog as the defining example.

    Although he never got to work with his idol Gram Parsons, who he immortalized in his classic signature song "The King of Broken Hearts" (also the title of a feature documentary on him), Lauderdale has realized that great dream of any musician – to stand shoulder to shoulder making music with his biggest inspirations. His duet albums with bluegrass icon Dr. Ralph Stanley earned Jim his first Grammy award, he’s penned albums worth of bluegrass gems with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter and he’s on a short list that includes Paul McCartney and Allen Toussaint as a writing partner of Elvis Costello.

    It’s no wonder that artists from Willie Nelson to John Oates line up to collaborate with him, hoping to snare some of that Lauderdale magic. After all, his songs have helped sell millions of albums for artists like George Strait, Dixie Chicks, Patty Loveless, Lee Ann Womack, Blake Shelton, Solomon Burke, Gary Allan and Vince Gill. Classic songs like "Where the Sidewalk Ends," "You Don’t Seem to Miss Me," "Hole in My Head," "Halfway Down," "We Really Shouldn’t Be Doing This" and many more have come from his pen.

    With his new album From Another World, Jim has once again opened his heart wide and delivered a record of original songs that plays like a greatest hits set. From the opening one-two punch of hard-charging Dylanesque "Some Horses Run Free" and desperation-led waltz "When You Can’t Have What Your Heart Wants," it’s obvious Lauderdale is firing on all cylinders. "The Secrets of the Pyramids" evokes the twangy psychedelia of the Byrds at their best, rich in harmonies from Third Man Records star Lillie Mae and her brother Frank Rische. The video is a tongue-in-cheek homage to the clip for Toto’s "Africa" and features Lauderdale and acclaimed singer-songwriter Elizabeth Cook in starring roles. Nothing evokes the ghosts of George Jones like instantly classic country love songs "For Keeps" (released this year on Valentine’s Day), "Like People From Another World" and "I’ll Forgive You If You Don’t." The expansive, questioning "One Away" leads into the empathetic finger-picked "Listen." "Slow Turn In The Road" is a bluesy chug lead by stinging guitars and a deeply soulful lead vocal, "Ever Living Loving Day" is the kind of clever-but-playful lyric he can write like no other and the album culminates in the wild rave-up "Are You Trying To Make A Song out of Us?"

    “When I write or play or get into the studio, it feels like it’s all coming together for me - that this is what I’m here to do. No matter what is going on in the rest of my life, how hard things sometimes get, I can leave behind this three and a half minute song and that makes it all worthwhile.”

    Website:
    http://www.jimlauderdale.com/

    Instagram:
    http://www.instagram.com/jimlauderdale1/

    Facebook:
    http://www.facebook.com/JimLauderdaleOfficial

    Twitter:
    http://twitter.com/jimlauderdale1

    The Mastersons with Bonnie Whitmore

    The Mastersons with Bonnie Whitmore

    Don't bother asking The Mastersons where they're from. Brooklyn, Austin, Los Angeles, Terlingua; they've called each home in just the last few years alone. If you really want to get to know this husband-and-wife duo, the better question to ask is where they're going. Perhaps more than any other band playing today, The Mastersons live on the road, perpetually in motion and always creating. Movement is their muse. On tour, in the unpredictable adventures and characters they cross, in the endless blur of skylines and rest stops and dressing rooms and hotels, that's where they find their greatest inspiration, where they hone their art, and where they crafted their brilliant new album, Transient Lullaby.

    "When you travel like we do, if your antenna is up, there's always something going on around you," reflects guitarist/singer Chris Masterson. "Ideas can be found everywhere. The hardest thing to find is time."

    For the last seven years, The Mastersons have kept up a supremely inexorable touring schedule, performing as both the openers for Steve Earle and as members of his band, The Dukes, in addition to playing their own relentless slate of headline shows and festivals. It was Earle, in fact, who pushed the duo to record their acclaimed debut, Birds Fly South, in the first place.

    "Before we hit the road with him in 2010, Steve said, 'You'd better have a record ready because I'm going to feature you guys during the show,'" remembers fiddler/tenor guitarist/singer Eleanor Whitmore. "We didn't even have a band name at the time. We were going through all these ideas and Steve suggested, 'Why don't you just be The Mastersons, and that was that."

    Upon its release in 2012, Birds Fly South was a breakout critical hit on both sides of the pond, with Uncut awarding the album 9/10 stars and Esquire dubbing The Mastersons one of the "Bands You Need To Know Right Now". Two years later, they followed it up with Good Luck Charm, premiered by the NY Times and praised by Mother Jones for its "big-hearted lyrics, tight song structures, and sweetly intertwined harmonies." Pop Matters ranked it "among the top Americana releases of 2014," while American Songwriter called it "a perfect soundtrack for a summer of warm nights and hot, lazy days," and the Austin Chronicle praised the band's "spunky wit and rare measure of emotional maturity." The album earned The Mastersons slots on NPR's Mountain Stage and at festivals around the world, from San Francisco's Hardly Strictly Bluegrass to Australia's Byron Bay Bluesfest.

    With endless touring came new levels of comfort and confidence, and when it was time to record Transient Lullaby, The Mastersons knew they wanted to take a different approach than their first two releases. The band set up shop at Arlyn Studios in Austin, TX, where Chris shared production duties with longtime friend and collaborator George Reiff (Ray Wylie Hubbard, Band of Heathens). Together, they chased a sound that was subtler and more evocative, deeper and more contemplative.

    "A lot of what we listen to when we have some rare time off is what we consider late night music," explains Chris, who previously played guitar with Son Volt and Jack Ingram among others. "The last record was bright and jangly and we wanted this one to be vibey and dark. A lot of the stuff is very performance-based and not at all fussed with. We've grown so much more comfortable in our skin that we really weren't trying to sound like anyone other than ourselves this time around."

    "We've had a lot of time and a lot of miles to refine our sound and our style of singing," adds Eleanor, whose resume includes work with Regina Spektor and Angus & Julia Stone. "I think the depth of our songwriting has really grown, too. Part of the time we're writing on a tour bus with Steve Earle, and the bar for poetry is pretty high when you're within earshot of one of the greatest songwriters alive."

    Rich with Eleanor's stirring string arrangements and Chris's masterful guitar work, the songs on Transient Lullaby more than live up to the challenge. The album opens with "Perfect," a loping duet written partially in Washington, DC, and partially in Newcastle, England, that paints a portrait of two broken lovers who still manage to find a strange optimism in this challenging world. Spare and affecting, the song puts the spotlight on the duo's intoxicating vocal harmonies and makes for an ideal entry point into an album full of characters facing down difficulty and darkness with all the grit and humility they can muster. "Fight," written in a downtown Cleveland hotel, is a wry wink at the battlefield of marriage ("I don't wanna fight with anyone else but you"), while the fingerpicked "Highway 1" twists and turns on a California road trip through an emotional breakup.

    "Life's not easy," reflects Chris. "It's hard for everybody, and I don't see it getting any easier. All you can hope for yourself is grace when walking through it, and someone to prop you up when you need a little help."

    Though it's a deeply personal album, Transient Lullaby is not without its political moments. The Mastersons found themselves on tour in Lexington, KY, during the height of Kim Davis' obstinate stand against the Supreme Court's same sex marriage decision, and so they penned the infectious "You Could Be Wrong" in a dressing room before taking the stage with "Love Wins" draped across their guitars. "This Isn't How It Was Supposed To Go"-a cosmic country duet written in Cologne, Germany-has taken on new layers of political meaning in 2017, while "Don't Tell Me To Smile" is a tongue-in-cheek feminist anthem, and the gorgeous, slow-burning "Fire Escape"-which came to life in a hockey rink locker room in Alberta, Canada-suggests that the only solution to a polarized world of fear and distrust is to find strength and guidance in our loved ones.

    "As we look at the world political landscape, global warming, a refugee crisis and the uncertain times we're all living in, rather than lose hope, we look to each other," Chris says. "It's a little brighter than Cormac McCarthy's The Road, but not much."

    Ultimately, the road is at the core of everything The Mastersons do. "Happy When I'm Movin'" reflects their constant need for forward momentum, both physically and emotionally, and the title track paints the pair as "pilgrims of the interstate" on an endless voyage. "No I don't unpack my bag / Traveling from town to town," they sing in beautiful harmony. "Set 'em up and knock 'em down / Where there's work and songs to sing / You'll know the place where I'll be found / If you don't want to be alone / Then come along."

    For The Mastersons, all that matters is where they're headed, and the songs they'll write when they get there.

     

    Website:
    http://www.themastersonsmusic.com

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