Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Race Talks: Opportunities for Dialogue

The Color of Fear (Part 2): What It’s Like to Be Gay

Kennedy School - Gymnasium

6 pm doors; 7 pm event

Free

Minor with parent or guardian

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Qualifies for “Attend a McMenamins History-Sponsored Event” Experience Stamp.

About The Color of Fear (Part 2): What It’s Like to Be Gay

The Color of Fear (Part 2): What It’s Like to Be Gay

In 1995, The Oprah Winfrey Show featured Lee Mun Wah and his groundbreaking film The Color of Fear, which gives an in-depth look into the state of race in America. In the era of Black Lives Matter, Gay Pride and chants of “Send them back,” with the urgency for racial reconciliation heightened, the film’s commentary is just as poignant today as it was 25 years ago. Join Race Talks as we explore this 3-part documentary series, September-November of 2019.

Part III: What It’s Like to Be Gay

Join us for a screening of, The Color of Fear (Part 2): What It’s Like to Be Gay, an insightful film about the state of race relations in America as experienced by North American men of African, Asian, European and Latinx descent. In 1994, Director Lee Mun Wah brought together this diverse group to dialogue about a wide range of topics--all under the umbrella of 'race relations in America'. Through the series of intelligent, emotional and dramatic discussions, the men reveal the pain and scars that racism has caused them. What emerges is a deeper sense of understanding and trust. Race Talks will explore this 4-part documentary series September – January 2020.

About Race Talks: Opportunities for Dialogue

Learning plus beer

Race Talks: Opportunities for Dialogue

This series deals with race in Oregon, both historically and up to the present time, to provide learning experiences that support the development of racial identity and sensitivity.

Each month, Kennedy School hosts a presentation on a different topic of ethnicity and racial elements in Oregon history, given by educators and/or experts in the topic at hand. The aim is to provide educational and learning experiences that support the development of intercultural sensitivity and racial identity.

This event is eligible for a History Pub Stamp