Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Edgefield History Pub

Celilo Falls: Parallel Lives Along N’Chewana

Edgefield - Blackberry Hall

5 pm doors, 6:30 pm event

Free. First come, first served. Arrive early!

All ages welcome

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Qualifies for “Attend a McMenamins History-Sponsored Event” Experience Stamp.

Why not stay the night too? Mention you’re attending the History Pub for 10% off your hotel room.

About Celilo Falls: Parallel Lives Along N’Chewana

Celilo Falls: Parallel Lives Along N’Chewana

Presented by Native Consultant Ed Edmo and Lani Roberts, retired OSU professor

In “Celilo Falls: Parallel Lives Along N’Che Wana,”community icon and Native American Elder, Ed Edmo, and former professor Lani Roberts write about growing up in rural Oregon during the 1950s. Ed is Shoshone Bannock, Nez Perce, Yakama and Siletz and lived at the fishing village at Celilo Falls until its destruction in March 1957. Lani grew up six miles away just outside The Dalles, a descendant of an early settler family. Although they grew up in the same area and are the same age, their lives were lived in parallel fashion because of the differences in their ethnic heritage. During their childhoods, signs in the windows of businesses read, “No dogs or Indians allowed.” Their juxtaposed stories give a full picture of rural Oregon and the parallel lives they led along the N’CheWana River.

About the Speakers:

Internationally acclaimed poet, storyteller, actor and clay artist, Ed Edmo uses puppets to tell Indian legends to children and adults - helping people learn to laugh again. Since 1981, Ed has traveled to colleges, pre-schools, trade shows, pow-wows, and more as a Native Consultant. In 1984, Ed earned top prize at the Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center One Act Play Festival for his play, Through Coyote's Eyes: A Visit with Ed Edmo. In addition to co-authoringCelilo Falls: Parallel Lives Along N’Che Wana” in, Seeing Color: Indigenous Peoples and Radicalized Ethnic Minorities in Oregon, he is also the author of A Nation Within.

Lani Roberts (Ph.D., B.A., Philosophy, University of Oregon) was a faculty member in the Philosophy Department at Oregon State University from spring 1989 through spring 2011. She has now retired and moved east of the Cascades, back home to the Columbia Gorge where her family settled in the 1860s.  

During her time in the OSU Philosophy Department, Professor Roberts directed the Graduate Program, coordinated the Applied Ethics Certificate, and directed the Peace Studies Program.  She was a founding member of Faculty and Staff for Peace and Justice at OSU, and a member of AFAPC (Association of Faculty for the Advancement of People of Color). 

Professor Roberts is the author of "Duty, Virtue and the Victim's Voice" in Duties to Others, edited by colleague Courtney Campbell. "One Oppression or Many?" and "Barriers to Feeling and Actualizing Compassion," both were published in The Journal of Philosophy in the Contemporary World. Roberts served as co-editor of this journal from 2004 to 2011.  She has also published chapters in two books, one on the rationale and structure of classes in the Difference, Power and Discrimination baccalaureate core at OSU, “Course Rationale, Criteria, and Design,” in Teaching for Change: the Difference, Power and Discrimination Model, and, secondly, with Ed Edmo, “Celilo Falls: Parallel Lives Along N’Che Wana,” in Seeing Color: Indigenous People and Racialized Ethnic Minorities in Oregon.

About Edgefield History Pub

Edgefield History Pub

These monthly, free events are open to everyone interested in Oregon and Pacific Northwest history. Co-sponsored by like-minded historical and civic organizations, we bring you experts, scholars, first-person experiencers and historians who expound on topics from Lewis and Clark to shipwrecks, hop growing to women pioneers and far, far beyond. It's like being back in the classroom - except this time you get to settle into comfortable seats and enjoy a drink or two with dinner while you listen and learn.

This event is eligible for a History Pub Stamp