Peachez and Crème

Red Rabbit Cream Ale with Peach Puree & Lactose

Old Church Special Beer Tasting

with

Live Music by

The Parson Red Heads

“Songs from Laurel Canyon”

  • 5 p.m. 'til beer is gone |
  • Limited-edition beer at happy hour pricing all night |
  • All ages; 21 & over to taste

About Peachez and Crème

While it’s a misconception that cream ales are literally creamy, we thought we’d go ahead and deepen the confusion with our Peachez and Crème ale. We’ve taken our popular Red Rabbit Cream Ale and added a healthy dose of peaches and a touch of lactose to enhance the creamy character of the beer. This beer is fruity, full and crisp; a perfect summer beer. Try tasting it against our Red Rabbit Cream Ale and see the difference between it and a traditional cream ale. Grab a slice of that sweet summer pie with Peachez and Crème Ale!

Malts: Superior Pilsen, Dextra-Pils, Flaked Corn
Hops: Crystal, Perle, Santiam, Sterling.
Adjuncts: Lactose, Peach Puree

OG: 1.050  TG: 1.008  ABV: 5.4%  IBU: 31  SRM: 3

Buzz Words: Fruity, Full, Crisp

About Old Church Special Beer Tasting

Content

Join us once a month as the brewery unveils another firkin handcrafted ale.

Talk to the brewers, ask beery questions, enjoy happy hour pricing all night long on these limited-edition pints and more.

And when the beer is gone, it's gone.

McMenamins Old Church Brewery - in the Beer Glass

About The Parson Red Heads

Content

While working on their third album, Orb Weaver, The Parson Red Heads weren't interested in taking their time. In fact, they were dead set against it. Having released a labored-upon LP in 2011's Yearling, the band had established a mode of meticulousness. On Orb Weaver, the focus on recreating the improvisational bombast of their live show was stage center, resulting in flashes of sun-stroked auditory maelstroms and expansive blotter-pop Americana previously missing from the band's recordings.

Over a nine-year career that's seen the band form in Oregon, then move to Los Angeles for nearly six years – where they were influential in a burgeoning music Silver Lake scene still seduced by the specters of Love and Buffalo Springfield – the now Portland-based Parsons have established a well-deserved reputation as an uninhibited live group. 

As vocalist/guitarist Evan Way explains, Orb Weaver was all about bottling that energy into one explosively off-the-cuff record. “We've always made records that were more thought-out,” says Way. “When we play live, we play more like a rock band. We wanted to show that more aggressive side of us, the more rock-oriented side.”

Producer Scott McCaughey (The Minus 5) was all-too-happy to steer the ship when it came to capturing the album's spontaneity. 
“The band had a vision for the record before we started,” says McCaughey. “A few songs took some exciting and possibly unplanned turns, but it all fit into the whole that we'd imagined.”

“[Scott] was great about being very vocal and honest, saying, ‘Don't ditch that, it has character and that makes it way cooler,’ ” adds Way.

The song “Lost Again” was originally a demo Way had discarded for contention to make the album. McCaughey, struck by the tune, suggested a different angle and encouraged the group to record it right away with a new and still very foreign arrangement. With Brette Marie Way-Evan's wife and The Parsons' vocalist/ drummer-providing typically dynamic harmonies, the result speaks volumes of the immediacy of Orb Weaver. It's a gorgeously sprawling composition, replete with reverbed guitar squalls and a saccharine-sweet melody that's belied only by its sly psych fringes.

“Borrow Your Car,” a breakneck power-pop scorcher penned and sung by guitarist Sam Fowles, ushers in the kind of fiery tune expected from The Parsons' live show, Fowles and bassist Charlie Hester forming interlocking melodic runs that strike out toward Nick Lowe terrain. Interestingly, McCaughey and The Parsons' only other collaboration before Orb Weaver was recording Lowe's “Don't Lose your Grip on Love” for Lowe Country, a compilation of country-tinged Lowe covers released on Fiesta Red Records.

Times begins with all the minimalist groove of Fleetwood Mac's “Dreams,” opening up only after Way croons, “I try to turn my back on you/but I forget to tell my heart,” then moves into their oft-cited harmonic telepathy with The Byrds and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

Despite the modest homage to their influences, The Parson Red Heads are a band forging their own musical identity with each new album.

“More and more of the personality of the band itself has come together because we're comfortable,” explains Way. “Everybody is settling into their roles; it's a natural result of playing a ton together.”

 

website:
http://www.theparsonredheads.com
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Tags for this Event:
Events > Beer, Wine, and Spirits Music: Singer/Songwriter Americana Property > Wilsonville Old Church & Pub

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